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Please join us this Friday evening June 6 for our new exhibit

Fire and Steel: The Metal Sculpture of Turry Lindstrom

Opening Reception
Friday, June 6
5 – 10 p.m.

Turry Lindstrom’s art often involves the use of heavy gauge steel plates upon which he draws complex algorithms, cuts out the designs, and heats them to the melting point to extract very complex designs. He was one of five artists who received an “emerging artist” scholarship at the 2014 Four Bridges Arts Festival in Chattanooga and was the recipient of a similar scholarship at this year’s Magic City Art Festival in Birmingham,AL. This exhibit, occupying the entire east gallery at Graffiti, will be Turry’s first one-man show in Chattanooga.

For a video of Turry working in his studio click this link:
http://vimeo.com/stevenllorca/turrylindstrom

In the remainder of the gallery will be new work by Graffiti resident artists Ellyn Bivin, Josiah Golson, David Jones, Renel Plouffe, and Derek Williams. Also on hand, for the first time, will be paintings by Sandra Paynter Washburn and the assemblage art of Ken Herrin, who recently relocated to Chattanooga from Eugene, Oregon

Visit our website http://www.hillcityart.com

About Us
Ranging from large-scale street art to works suitable for home and office, Graffiti offers exciting, contemporary, original art at accessible prices. Located in North Chattanooga at 505 Cherokee Blvd, next to Sluggos restaurant, our goal is to bring modern art to Chattanoogans and visitors who share our progressive attitude toward design. We specialize in Contemporary Art For Urban Spaces.

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‘Acrylic and Beyond’ featured at Michael’s in Dalton

michaels-show-dalton

Sandra Washburn is the featured artist during an exhibit featured throughout May at Michael’s Fine Arts & Framing in Dalton, Ga. “Acrylic and Beyond” was her only scheduled one-person show for the year, but she will mount a large exhibit in May 2014 at the Creative Arts Guild in Dalton.

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New exhibit at Lede Gallery in North Carolina

The Art of Sandra Paynter Washburn will be featured in the exhibit “Content Driven” from May 11 to June 6, 2012, at the Lede Gallery in Wake Forest, N.C. To learn more, visit the gallery website.

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Podcast interview with Sandra Paynter Washburn

Sandra Paynter Washburn is interviewed by The Customs House Museum in Clarksville, Tenn., about her career, art and her new exhibit.

Sandy Washburn Customs House Museum Podcast Interview

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Font of creativity takes form in Washburn’s ‘Assemblages’

By Karen Parr-Moody | Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. — With a breadth of work that includes mixed media and painting, “Assemblages: The Art of Sandra Paynter Washburn” inhabits The Customs House Museum through March 11.

Washburn received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in art education at University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In the last five years she has expanded her portfolio to include metalsmith works and artisan jewelry. This later practice is seen in the various metal pieces she incorporates into her assemblages.

One such piece is the assembled wooden box titled “Little Red Whatnot,” which has metal tags hanging off its bottom. Stamped into the metal are phrases such as “Shut that Frigidaire,” “Don’t track mud in here,” “Never run with scissors,” “Get yourself in here,” and “Don’t slam the door.”

In the midst of these tags hangs a pair of bisque doll legs. They echo the disembodied porcelain doll head placed prominently at the top of the box.

“Little Red Whatnot,” like other wooden assemblages by Washburn, has a mysterious air due to its many angles and corners that hold more clues to the piece’s intention. For example, one has to crouch a big to find the metal plate that says “Good Girl.” It is tucked under the compartments in this piece and it hovers above the faded picture of a young girl. Encased in a rusty bottle cap, she seems to float in time, lost in the mist.

This piece seems to explore the many roles women play in this world from childhood to adulthood. Placed into the sides of the compartments are two pictures of women. One is a dance hall type who has the words “Bad girl” at her base. The other is a Renaissance style woman whose label is “Sad girl.”

Washburn also manages to infuse her paintings and two-dimensional mixed media pieces with emotion. There is the sexy high gloss of “Rapt in Red,” a painting done in acrylic and gold leaf.

The mixed media piece “Starry” includes a royal blue sky topped by a barren winter tree, its leafless trunk and branches patchy with tones of gray, chocolate, taupe and rose. Charmingly, raised paper stars have been affixed to the painting and a few casually fall into the frame. There is a childlike innocence to this piece.

“Distant Grove I” and “Distant Grove II” remind one of the mixed media works of Peter Beard, who has spent decades in Africa creating collages in a diary style. Washburn’s pieces have that same wildness, a heat that reminds one of the African plains. In “Distant Grove I” there is a wide tree that casts a shadow, not in gray, but in a vivid flame of orange. It speaks to the beating fire of the midday sun. This piece also features a raised paper square that shows a tribal figure who could easily be beating a drum around some exotic camp.

Washburn’s works are so intricate that one could spend a great deal of time walking slowly from one to another, absorbed in each. Equally, they possess a wide variety. As one passes from one piece to the next, one is struck by this finding, and also struck with a thought: “How could one artist create so many works with such a degree of differentiation?” Surely Washburn’s mind is a font of creativity and, lucky for her — and for us — she has the technical skills to give physical shape to her ideas.

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Artist Sandra Paynter Washburn Exhibits “Assemblages” at Customs House Museum

From Arts Online, the newsletter of the Tennessee Arts Commission

“Making art is an integral part of my life. It is a blessing, a way of accessing and expressing inner scapes that would otherwise go unexplored. Simple acts like squeezing paint onto my palette and mixing the colors take me to a place where I am challenged and appreciated, refined and encouraged. I like the puzzle that is art, the challenge of figuring out what works and what doesn’t, and why” says Sandy Washburn. Her mixed media works will open at the Customs House Museum on January 10th.

Sandra received a BFA in Art Education at UNC-Greensboro, with studio concentrations in painting and fibers. Primarily working with acrylic paint using mixed media techniques, Washburn’s compositions contain elements of collage. Within the last five years, Sandra has further expanded the scope of her artistic focus to include metal smithing and artisan jewelry production. Initially taken with the colors and patterns in gemstones, she soon began to include cold connections metal joining techniques in her embellishments, and learned soldering, forging, and metal finishes. Assemblages, on exhibit through March 11th, will include both mixed media pieces and jewelry.

Sandra has taught workshops for the Tennessee Art Education Association, Arrowmont School, Hunter Museum of American Art, Tennessee Watercolor Society, Knox County Schools, Tennessee Art League of Nashville, Townsend Atelier, Association of Visual Artists, and Tennessee Artists Association of Knoxville, among others. Her works have been featured in numerous juried shows and in many art publications including The Artists Magazine; and are included in many important private and public collections worldwide. She is a member of the National Watercolor Society, Signature Status; Southern Watercolor Society, Signature Status; Tennessee Watercolor Society, Signature Status; National Collage Society; and the Tennessee Association of Craft Artist.

Located at the corner of Second and Commerce Streets, the Customs House Museum is the second largest general museum in Tennessee. Regular museum hours are 10 am to 5 pm Tuesday through Saturday, and 1 to 5 pm on Sundays. Adult admission is $7, Sr. Citizens and College ID $5, Ages 6 to 18 $3, and under six is free. For more information on above events contact Terri Jordan, Exhibits Curator, at 931-648-5780 or terri@customshousemuseum.org.

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Podcast interview with Sandra Paynter Washburn

Sandra Paynter Washburn is interviewed by The Customs House Museum in Clarksville, Tenn., about her career, art and her new exhibit.

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‘In the Studio’ with Sandra Paynter Washburn

Sandra Paynter Washburn featured in “In the Studio,” an artist profile on the Art Creations website.

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Artist Sandra Paynter Washburn Exhibits “Assemblages” at Customs House Museum

From Arts Online, the newsletter of the Tennessee Arts Commission

CLARKSVILLE  — “Making art is an integral part of my life. It is a blessing, a way of accessing and expressing inner scapes that would otherwise go unexplored ” says Sandra Paynter Washburn. Her mixed media works will open at the Customs House Museum on Jan.10. Primarily working with acrylic paint using mixed media techniques, Washburn’s compositions contain elements of collage. Within the last five years, Sandra has further expanded the scope of her artistic focus to include metal smithing and artisan jewelry production. Initially taken with the colors and patterns in gemstones, she soon began to include cold connections metal joining techniques in her embellishments, and learned soldering, forging and metal finishes. “Assemblages,” on exhibit through March 11, will include both mixed media pieces and jewelry. Sandra has taught workshops for the Tennessee Art Education Association, Arrowmont School, Hunter Museum of American Art, Tennessee Watercolor Society, Knox County Schools, Tennessee Art League of Nashville, Townsend Atelier, Association of Visual Artists, and Tennessee Artists Association of Knoxville, among others. Her works have been featured in numerous juried shows and in many art publications including The Artists Magazine; and are included in many important private and public collections worldwide

© 2015 Sandra Paynter Washburn | Site by RamseyMedia » wgramsey.com